Thoughts While Watching the End of a Great Civilization

The United States of America is unique in its governmental structure and the freedoms afforded its people. It stands as the land of the free, the home of the brave, the bastion of equity and freedom throughout the world ……. except there are some issues.

To run a sovereignty on the stage of the world, one must have some secrets. It isobvious to the intelligent and the educated that for a government to protectits people, it must protect itself. A level of suspicion and care must be utilized to assure that secrets are kept and that the plans set forth are not foiled, even by the constituents of such a government. It is also true that the people who constitute a democratic republic have a duty and a right to accurate and honest information about what said government does on the stage of the world, and introspectively toward its people. Kennedy put it thusly;

Ladies and Gentlemen, The very word secrecy is repugnant in a free and open society…. we are, as a people, opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths, and to secret proceedings…. there is very grave danger that the announced need for increased security will be seized upon by those anxious to expand its meaning to the very limits of official censorship and concealment. That I do not intend to permit to the extent that it is in my control. and no official of my administration whether his rank is high or low, civilian or military, shall interpret my words here tonight as an excuse to censor the news, to stifle dissent, to cover up our mistakes or to withhold from the press or the public the facts they deserve to know, but we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy that relies primarily on covert means for expanding its sphere of influence, on infiltration, instead of invasion, on subversion instead of elections, on intimidation instead of free choice, on guerillas by night instead of armies by day. It is a system that has conscripted vast human and material resources into a tightly knit, highly-efficient machine that combines military, diplomatic, intelligence, economic, scientific, and political operations.…”

A short time later, his motorcade slowed to a near stop in a nearly empty Dealey Plaza, Dallas Texas, and assassins executed him. We were immediately told that he was killed by a slight man, with Cuban ties. Even today, the relevant documents are hidden from us. Even today the truth is cloaked to protect some nameless people or organization, who we may otherwise act against, if the truth was allowed. When we understand what was happening in Kennedy’s time, it sheds light on his statements and his intentions. When he asks the press to tell the truth, is he asking them to do that which is right in the face of pressure to do otherwise? He sees the birth of President Trump’s “Fake News” and he opposes it, threatening to expose those who seek to control our press and the truth.

One of the remarkable things about this murder is that almost no one believes what we were told. It seems that Kennedy thought more of the abilities of Americans than did those who followed. It is a cover-up. It has been since the day when a coffin with a dead man was flown back to Washington with a crying and blood-soaked widow standing by. One of the few truths told during those hellish days was told by Oswald, himself, when he said “I am a patsy.”

He was a patsy, set up and murdered to hide some truth, a truth that remains, still, hidden. I use Kennedy’s assasination as an example because it is so well documented andwitnessed. There are a million such truths. Still, there is the “other” truth, the truth that we are fed, the truth that is “acceptable”. So often I hear said, to those who question, “You are a conspiracy theorist.” It seems that John Kennedy was a conspiracy theorist, too. There are those who despise conspiracy theorists including both of the George Bushes. Each of them declared, at different times in history that such conjecture was not to be tolerated. “We will not tolerate conspiracy theories, which tend to divert attention from the true perpetrators of this crime, Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda” (paraphrased).

From Wikipedia:

Operation Mockingbirdwas an alleged large-scale program of the United States Central Intelligence Agency(CIA) that began in the early 1950s and attempted to manipulate news media for propaganda purposes. It funded student and cultural organizations and magazines as front organizations.

This is a remarkable thing. An intelligence organization manipulating the press to bend the truth for purposes of propaganda. Could this be what Kennedy referred to when he said, “I am not asking your news papers to support an administration, but I am asking your help in the tremendous task of informing and alerting the American people.” Kennedy was President at the beginning of “Operation Mockingbird”. During Kennedy’s tenure, too, the operation to destabilize the sovereign nations of Central America was ongoing; 1954-Guatemala, 1959-Haiti, 1961-Bay of Pigs in Cuba, to be followed by 1969-Uruguay, 1971-Bolivia, 1973-Chile, 1980-El Salvador.

Now, these many years later, we are told that “Operation Mockingbird” was disbanded. I believe that President Trump’s “Fake News” is the fruit of this operation or its offspring. Any thinking person can see the spin assigned to certain stories. Still, the majority are, seemingly, mindless drones believing what is told, even when the flaws in the tale are so obvious.

One may, if sufficiently old, as am I, reflect back to Nancy Reagan telling America to “Just say NO to drugs.” Think of the implications of the cooperation with Noriega and other such men and the allowed movement of cocaine into the United States that took place, under the nose and the signature of her husband, at the hands of Ollie North and his superiors, who he so dutifully protected. I remember Miami and other such cities being awash in cocaine. Meanwhile, “black operations” were funded with a part of the proceeds. Now our cities are, again, awash in drugs. Now it is heroin instead of cocaine.

Then we destabilized Central America with its coca plants. Now we are destabilizing the Middle-East and Afghanistan with its poppies. I think it a reasonable probability that the gains from looking the other way may, well, now fund the “Project for a New American Century,” a think-tank written document that planned the actions of the United States of America against the countries of the Mid-East before they occurred. (Many of those drafting the document became the Cabinet for G. W. Bush, and acted to enact their plan.)

America was drafted by a small group of men who bet everything on the slight chance of a fledgling nation to grow to become the “Land of the Free, The Home of the Brave.” They would be disgusted at what we have become. We are neither. There is no freedom without privacy. When a government spies on their people, they cannot, also be free. Brave men would not have allowed freedom to be subrogated to induced fear, fear designed to control. We are controlled. We are manipulated. We are threatened, and we are far from free. A government that is acting in the best interests of its people, a government that is “of the people, by the people, and for the people”, as Lincoln (paraphrased from a 1384 prologue to a translation of the Bible by John Wycliffe) included in the Gettysburg Address, has no need for propaganda, for coverups, for torture.

The earth is awash with relics of grand societies and governments. They are buried in the sands of time, hidden in deep jungles, manifested in tablets, and monoliths, and hieroglyphics on the walls of tombs. They include the Roman aqueducts, roadways, frescos, mosaics, and the ashes of the burned library of Alexandria. Little is known of these societies. Knowledge is not a lineal progression. Mankind is too flawed to use the past to build upon.

Now, we, the great United States of America, watch on the sidelines of our government, as our roadways and bridges crumble, our dams fail, our once great infrastructure decays into our own irrelevance. Perhaps in some unnamed desert one day, a man in a hat will brush from the soils of time, a case. He will carefully remove the dirt and oxidation. He will peer through the shattered glass, and there, torn and decayed, perhaps he will read “we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal….”

We are losing everything so hard fought for, so dear, still, we stand by, impotent and dumb, and watch as history repeats itself. Shame on us.

Scott Cahill

An Open Letter to President Donald Trump on Infrastructure

By now, Mr. President, you have seen much. Most are things best hidden to those who wish for solace. The issues are massive, the opposition organized, the system failing.

In the history of man there have been many great societies. Many times, mankind has achieved greatly, only to lose it all. This is exemplified with the remains of ancient Egypt, Rome, Mesopotamia, the pyramids, the ashes of the library at Alexandria.

Today, we, again have reached a position of understanding and accord. Governments vie to find relationships. The world struggles to build on accumulated knowledge and to find, in the future, a better place for the evolution of the experiment of mankind.

History speaks to the present through shattered fragments of the past. They are unearthed from the sands of deserts, the dark depths of the ocean, and the sultry jungle underbrush. Magnificent objects of architecture and art tell of a time of sophistication and reflection lost to all humanity through a failure of governance.

Men form governments to develop societies that allow a foundation upon which men can build a better life for themselves, and a better future for all. These societies are exemplified in the infrastructure that defines the quality of such a government. Rome manifested itself from the fractions of the Mediterranean, conquering and enlightening, building roads, dams, bridges and aqueducts, which both defined the government and acted as a foundation upon which they reached for understanding and equity. Such infrastructure is more than a sign of the success of a government or society. It is the very essence upon which it is built. Basic human needs must be met before one may set off on the pursuit of knowledge, understanding, and artistic expression. Infrastructure is, then, more than an expression of societal success, it is the physical mechanism which allows society to reach for a better future. It is the defining thing that exemplifies a successful government and a successful society.

Rome fell, its colosseum crumbling under the weight of time and neglect, the carefully laid roadways slowly crumbling beneath the wheels of carts. Water was conducted to cities, until the water stopped flowing, the sewer system stagnated, disease found a foothold, and the earth, again, took from mankind that which was hers to take, the stone became dust, the rivers flowed unimpeded, the cities died off, and an entire society became erased from the face of the earth. With it died the knowledge of the eons. With it died great potential. The loss is universally unacceptable to any thinking man, still, history has seen such failure repeating itself deeply into the fog of time.

One must wonder, if one understands the history of man, if infrastructure is a reflection of a well-run government, or, indeed, if the successful government is, in fact, a reflection of its infrastructure.

Throughout history we have seen the crumbling of infrastructure as a prelude to the failure of governments. During America’s industrial revolution and up until a decade beyond the end of World War II, the infrastructure of America was new, efficient, and well maintained. It gave us great advantage. Commerce was smooth on our interstate highway system, the intercoastal waterway, the many canal systems. Our ports grew to be the grandest and most efficient in the world. The infrastructure of North America drew investment from the world, because it resulted in a reduced cost to produce and conduct goods for global markets. Entrepreneurs congregated in great new cities like New York and Chicago, San Diego, and Los Angeles. Money was made easily. Taxes were paid, and our nation became flush. We continued to grow and invest, but we neglected our infrastructure. There is little glory in the maintenance of the infrastructure of a nation. Dams and bridges, highways and waterways seemed to require little attention and they got little.

After World War II great investments were made in steel. The devastated country of Japan was a better place for that investment. It was a clean slate, subordinate in government, and needing employment and investment. Our steel mills won the war for the allies, churning out tanks, arms, and planes at an unprecedented level. Now, the great mills were allowed to decay. They crumbled as Japan grew to become the greatest steel producer in the world. Imagine that raw materials could be withdrawn from the banks of the Great Lakes, transported across the Pacific, there smelted, rolled, and transported back across the Pacific more efficiently and more cheaply than the steel could be made in the mills of the U.S. That is the cost of inefficient infrastructure.

Today, the United States has infrastructure which acts as a liability. It keeps us from competing on the world stage. The cost of transportation is great because of the traffic congestion, ports are choked with containers, the waterways are silted in and un-dredged. The canals no longer exist. We regulate our manufacturing into failure, while buying from those who pollute without environmental consideration. All of the money saved by not maintaining our infrastructure is lost many times over by the cost of the operating liability that it creates. Instead, we react to failure of elements of infrastructure. This is the least cost-effective methodology to employ. It is our primary methodology.

The relationship of cost of maintenance vs. cost of repair is difficult to assess, still, it is near constant.  Always, the cost of maintaining elements of infrastructure such as dams is significantly less than allowing a failure or near-failure and then making repairs. This ratio of maintenance and repair vs. near failure and repair is close to 1/10. If a maintenance issue will cost a thousand dollars to address, the repair if allowed to nearly fail will be ten thousand dollars. There are, of course exceptions to this rule. Most of those exceptions exceed significantly the 1/10 rule.

This cost relationship of maintenance to repair ignores, completely the very real losses of a traumatic failure. Such cost is measured in devastation of property and loss of life. Those ratios are incalculable. If one sets aside the loss of life, the ratio jumps to easily exceed 1/100. Significant dams in highly populated areas exceed this substantially. For instance, the Oroville Dam in California, which recently came within forty five minutes of failure threatened the entire growing area of the San Joaquin Valley, its homes, businesses, roadways and power grid. The cost of repair, as it now stands will be around a Billion dollars. This ratio is close to 1/500. (The repair will cost us five hundred times what the maintenance would have cost us).

The cost if it had failed would have been closer to a Trillion. (1/500,000). Human life lost could have exceeded a million, and damage would have involved the entire state to Los Angeles. Costs would accrue for decades. The impact on the federal budget, too, would have been significant, an impact that would have impacted, drastically national security. This dam was in the process of failure while the emergency spillway passed only 3% of the design flood.

It may seem an inverse process, in the face of debt and fiscal uncertainty, to spend heavily on infrastructure improvement. History shows clearly that the decay of infrastructure is the prelude to the loss of society and government. If one sets out to stop the progression toward failure of a great nation, one must commit oneself to the complete and total reconstruction and repair of its infrastructure. This action alone, will change the tide of erosion of a society.

Rebuilding infrastructure produces jobs, but that is only the initial cost/benefit. The improved roadways, bridges, dams, utilities, ports, airports and control, and waterways produce a beneficial playing field for entrepreneurship and investment. Because of improved commerce, there are gainful jobs, profit increase, tax base increases. When people are a part of such an evolution, pride of country and community return, bias fades. Men need a collective effort and a shared result.

If it is your goal to make this magnificent country of our “Great Again”, start with addressing the infrastructure. It alone is the foundation of our entire society.

Scott Cahill

Parallel Universes crashing through one another unseen and unheard, hidden behind a veil of relative motion

 

Albert Einstein pontificated the relationships of space and time. Within the Theory of Relativity, which he drafted in the Zurich patent office, he defined these relationships and the influence of speed of motion upon time itself. From his math we finally began to accept that, as objects progress toward the speed of light their time slows. Time elsewhere remains constant. He saw that, given this warpage of time, it would be impossible to exceed the speed of light (299,792,458 meters/second). This is a seemingly impossible reality to comprehend.

He further declared that the speed of light was a constant, independent of the position or speed of the observer. Many, including Einstein, thought that there must be an influence to maintain the speed of light in space.

Beyond the speed of light, relative to our position of observation, there may be universes, moving toward, away, and through us completely unnoticed. Perhaps the thing that defines one universe from another, forever dividing the entirety of all of matter and energy is a simple thing, relative motion.

If this is so, there may be many universes, each as real as the others, each occupying the same space and time for a moment, each with the same quirks of distortion within the relative movement of elements within its whole. We would see little or nothing of them but, perhaps the background noise of their interplay that seeps into our realm.

We know that the majority of mass and energy is “black” unseen and unknown to man, still, from gravitational computation, we know that it is there, somewhere. Perhaps that “black matter” is only another universe passing through us while we sleep separated from us only by its relative motion.

California

Go west young man, that was the cry that echoed in newspapers and magazines throughout the settled eastern United States. Families loaded up the wagon, tied the cow to the back and set off on a nearly impossible mission, to surmount the vast plains and desserts, mountains and rivers, wild animals and wild men, to find themselves in the promised land.

There, there was gold and opportunity, and the hurdle of the effort of the journey, was the only barrier to assimilating the wealth and prosperity that was waiting there. It sprang from the ground as crops, it was found as nuggets in rivers, it was cut from the hard rock of the mountains or the giant forests of redwood. Oroville was named for the gold, a manifestation, perhaps, of the wealth of every kind that the resources of that once beautiful state assured anyone who dared to make the journey. The desperate walked across a continent, assured that beyond the western horizon, one could share in some measure, riches beyond imagination, if only the water held out across the desert, the cold, or heat, or disease, or savages did not steal life along the way.

So was borne a state that would become a leader. California led the way in commerce, communications, cinema, progressive ideas and ideals, and electronics. Now they lead us to the end of our society. Always we could look to California as a testing place for progressive thought. Now we see the place where we are going, again, reflected back to us, magnified by unchecked progression.

This reflection is not a pretty thing. It is a sea of human waste and needles on the sidewalks of San Francisco. It is in the complete failure to govern. It is the very worst of representative government, tempered with political correctness, and the promise of safety. It is the complete collapse of a once-great economy into bankruptcy before our eyes.

California is dying. The promise is gone. It is a failure too large to fix, too sad to comprehend, too relevant to ignore. Progressive thought is a good thing. It is the eventuality of the failure to control the evolution of society that has killed California, that is slowly killing the United States.

No legislative action can address all of the potential frailties of man. America was not founded on the principal of a grand government that could coddle us, protecting us. It was the last place on earth where you could load up your wagon and set off across the desert. It was the last place where you could be free to fail and be only bleached bones in the sand or succeed and become anything imaginable. We were handed this wonderful thing, freedom. We are letting it slip through our fingers.

Scott Cahill

Who Will Nourish the Tree of Liberty?

History exists in the present.  We rarely see it as what it is, until time has allowed the pieces to settle on the playing board of life.

Today, history is happening beneath our noses, on our televisions, our newspapers. It is a horrible and a difficult evolution. This is not a time of peace, it is the verge of great conflict. When history of today is told, tomorrow, it will be a story of the repair or of the failure of democracy, the repair or failure of the middle class, the repair or failure of equity under the law. We, I suppose, are fortunate to witness great change, still, I wish that democracy, honor, and equity were simple, the static state of government. They are not. They have never been. Jefferson said it thusly in a letter to William Stephens Smith Nov. 13, 1787:

“…what country can preserve it’s liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? let them take arms. the remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon & pacify them. what signify a few lives lost in a century or two? the tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots & tyrants. it is it’s natural manure.”

Let us hope that this is not the enrichment that the soil of our liberty requires. Let us hope that we have evolved to address these polarizations of position and politics through open debate, still, see for yourself the unfolding of the exact opposite.

I never believed that I would witness propagandization of news in our country. I never dreamed that I would see those who address the questions silenced by orchestrated censorship, yet the tracks of totalitarianism are in the snow. I see them everywhere. They sneak in the night to take from us our freedoms. There is only one reason for such actions. They are never done to provide safety. What safety had Mr. Jefferson? They are done to control, to take advantage of those who fail to defend their liberty.

Jefferson’s point was that freedom is a precarious position of mankind. It is tenuous and difficult to balance and maintain the ideals of many to maintain an equitable government. America has done that, to show the world that men can govern themselves. Now, it is us who show the world that the Iron Rule of Oligarchy will fail in the end.

What patriot shall come forward to take up the battle that must be shouldered to confront and to expose the evil that exists and is pervasive and insidious in its erosion of all that is good about this great republic?

Scott Cahill