Little Girls, Beauty Contests, Death and A Failure of Justice

Someone killed a little girl. It was a long time ago and the case was never closed, the perpetrator never found.

JonBenet was a little beauty queen. The entirety of the scene, where little girls wear makeup and gowns, swimsuits, and parade before judges to be assessed is a somewhat disgusting scenario to me. How and why would anyone subject their child to such a situation?

Patsy Ramsey, the mother, was also a beauty queen in her day. Perhaps it is less odd to others. Perhaps the whole thing was “normal” to Patsy.

Many have written about this murder of a little girl. Most did research and interviewed witnesses. I did none of that. I have no idea of who killed this little girl, who would be a twenty six year old lady, if she were alive today.

It is such a superficial scene, such an obvious set of circumstances. Many blame incompetent police work. Many blame the parents, even accuse them.

I wonder, when confronted with information which appears to allow for closure, if there must not be some secondary actions at play – some one, or thing, being protected, or compromised. An “arrangement” that went bad, a frustrated diplomat, who went too far – too important to indict, too connected to reveal – let off into the night for others to tie up the loose ends – of the unthinkable.

I have no earthshaking exposure to shed light on the untimely and horrible loss. I offer only a word of wonder – how such a thing can happen without an offsetting justice. To me, there is no greater innocence than that of a child. Such a loss seems to cry out for equity, yet find none, mired in actions which yield no closure.

When I was young I believed in justice. Now I am old and I see the world with the veil lifted. I wish for that which I believed. I wish for the simple equity that I was assured, but, for me, for us, for JonBenet, it is but a ruse. Failure of justice is hard to look at. Perhaps that is why the lady wears a blindfold.

Scott Cahill